Shka La Kha Boom BoomHimesh Reshammiya’s much talked Sufi rock and pop has always been “talk of the town” and this time the expectations are gargantuan for musical thriller
SHAKALAKA BOOM BOOM. The year started off mildly with average success of RED followed by the colossal musical triumph in NAMASTEY LONDON. Suneel Darshan’s entertainers have been lauded by the musical flair of musical duo Nadeem Shravan for decades but SHAKALAKA BOOM BOOM breaks this reunion. The album experiments with collection of five periodically brief soundtracks that gist’s out an ambience of musical thrill. These presumed to be concert numbers are embellished with pulsating trendy musical thump from leading singing talents but are short-lived with brief duration of two minutes. Earlier it was experienced in 70’s where films like HUM KISI SE KUM NAHIN scintillated with full bloom where the musical rendezvous of entertaining numbers wrote history. SHAKALAKA BOOM BOOM fails to be as rhapsodic or nostalgic as its predecessor’s but promises to be booty-shaking in effective line up of 14 soundtracks with strong tinge of Sufi funk and western pop.

Rollickingly snazzy hip-hop by Earl followed by Reshammiya’s pulsating nasal twang in titillating musical bang pumps up the youthful zest for the intrinsically
hip-shaking and rumbustiously entertaining title track “Shakalaka Boom Boom”. This Afro-American styled hip-hop number has the harmonic setting of enticing flute notes and conventional “tabla-sarangi” loops that cement the enthused musical flow with vocal ebullience of singers (Himesh Reshammiya and Akriti Kakkar) with panache. This chartbuster number has nothing promising for Akriti but treasure it for Reshammiya’s pompous rendition (similar to “Aashiqui Mein Meri” (36 CHINATOWN)) as he has always been proficient in delivering worthy title tracks. “Shakalaka Boom Boom (remix)” ignites senses with strong feel of music video where the ethics of conventional funky club mix have been refurbished with élan.Rock it!

Folksy penned and contemporary punched with titillating sounds and beats, this sparingly romantic number “Thare Vaaste” brings in the vivaciousness of the
contemporaries Shaan and Sunidhi Chauhan to the ears. It brings out the chirpy and bubbly romantic overtures of “24 X 7 I think of you” (36 CHINATOWN) with fine blend of Rajasthani folksy worded lyrics by eminent Sameer. It promises to be worth hearing situational number if it finds the fine clubbing of slick cinematography and pristine choreography. “Thare Vaaste (remix)” sounds like unwelcome guest where the accelerated tempo has been infused with extra energetic flow with jarring impact.

Pugnaciously romantic to the core, Reshammiya is at his audible best in delivering the hot flaring desire of broken heart in the intense Sufi-pop number “Naamumkin”. Reshammiya revamps his best sentimental works (“Viranniyan” (NAMASTEY LONDON), “Dil Ne Yeh Jaana (RED)) with similar tonal textures and conventional Sufi pop flair. The tragically inclined sentiments are worded expressively by Sameer where the lover excruciates his unbearable pain with synchronized Sufi-western musical fusion. The intimidating “lounge” music impact creates a furor of emotions where the echoed vocals are clubbed with peppy disco beats fillers in highly impressive “Naamumkin (remix)”.

Reshammiya retraces the path of painful and remorseful romantic emotions as he unravels it with similar venomous binge in “Dil Lagayeenge”. It has soppy flavors of frolicking concert number where the singer emotes out with acrimonious fling. This situational has gripping of worthy emotional number but fails to stand out anything chartbusting for the album prospects.

“Dil Lagayeenge (remix)” has the awarding of promotional number where the snazzy disco beats camouflages delightfully with the connotations of rhythmic patterns with racy impact of echoing vocals.

The epigrammatic rendition of five musical soundtracks where prodigal singers croons their ecstasy, pain, love and suffering makes their first splash in Shaan rendered “Issi Umeed Pe”. This bright sentimental number emotes out the heart felt outburst of a lover with ear-splitting musical settings with a situational feel.

Kunal Ganjawala’s quivering and jerky vocals collages boisterously with foot-thumping and uproarious musical pace in the loud-pitched “Saathiya”. Sunidhi
Chauhan’s brief rendition adds tinge of femininity with a choral feel of well applauded concert number.

The sentimental buzz is highlighted with soft and sauntering pop music feel as svelte Alisha Chinai and stylish Shaan vocals relives the passion in sentimental “Aaj Nahi to Kal”.

The sentimental feel is extenuated with different set of vocals and rhythmic beat pattern in semi-folksy rendition of Kunal Ganjawala and Sunidhi Chauhan in “Tera Sona Sona Roop”   .

The finale comes in the form of emotional bidding to the beloved as impressive Shaan pull down curtains in rhetorically expressive “Rukhsat”.

Reshammiya accommodates the space and collages all the five brief soundtracks into one hefty package of eight minute plus soundtrack “Medley (remix)”. The déjà vu of prodigies fighting for supremacy on floors is highlight with periodic repetition of five short-lived tracks – “Issi Umed Pe”, “Aaj Nahi to Kal”, “Tera Sona Sona Roop”, “Rukhsat” and “Saathiya”.

Himesh Reshammiya’s third offering SHAKALAKA BOOM BOOM comes as mixed bag where the title track outshines all other numbers while tracks like
“Naamumkin”, “Dil Lagaayenge” are rehashed musical make over of his previous hit tracks. The success of five brief soundtracks is limited to its situational cinematic display while album enjoys the back-up of aggressive promotion and impressive face value.

Source: Glamsham

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